Saturday, January 2, 2016

El A'Cccord 1988 Honda Accord

The Honda Accord isn't exactly known for being a paradigm of excitement, even the lauded 6-speed coupe version is about as fun as Betty White in a poodle skirt.  Honestly the only way you are going to get me excited about an Accord is if you find a REALLY clean original example...or an El Camino'd version.  Find this 1988 Honda Accord offered for $800 near Denver, CO via craigslist.  Tip from matthewdesigns.



This isn't your father's Accord, unless your father was some kind of hacksaw wielding lunatic, then it probably was his car.  Is that a bed frame in front of the rear "window"?  And is that a piece of ugly furniture in a few of the pics?


 See another small Honda pickup? tips@dailyturismo.com

20 comments:

  1. Yes, every single penny. Which one doesn't matter.

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  2. To my highly trained eye, that is not a bed frame, but (worse) the side rail of a futon. I had one just like it in my spare room. Maybe they were just moving it, rather than having incorporated it into their "design". Mind you, it would do a good job of protecting that rear window. Speaking of that rear window, what the heck is that anyway? It looks like a Japanese rice-paper blind (possibly a subtle nod to the car's heritage, by the "designer"?).

    My first assumption was that this started out as an Accord Wagon (a logical jumping off point for sake-fueled El-Camino conversion) but then I noticed that it only has two doors. Maybe it was a hatchback to start? So many questions. I hope the "designer" joins this conversation...

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    Replies
    1. Definitely started as a hatchback. After studying it, the rear window looks likely to be some form of plexiglass because it has screws holding it in. What looks like rice paper is horizontal overlapping pieces of masking tape.

      Rhetorical question: If you are covering up the rear window with tape to the point that you can't see out of it, why not just spray paint over it? Black paint would at least imitate tinting. Silly me, I just remembered, a can of black spray paint costs a few pennies more than a roll of tape. Don't break the bank when customizing your ride.

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  3. just got it two months ago......figured I'd ditch it

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  4. The Daily Turismo Generalismos are employing the fine art of lowering expectations for the new year by offering this dual experiment combining crystal meth and a sawzall. Now, just about any other car will register as; "well, it sure is better than that POS Honda Accord."

    It is comforting to know that it is legally registered as a "truck" and not illegally registered as a truck. If someone is sniffing at this end of CL listings, legality is probably high up on the priority list.

    Current tag, lights work, good to go.

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  5. So mini wheels fit Honda? Learn something new everyday.

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    Replies
    1. Mini's are 4x100
      Accords are 4x114.3 (until 2000-something when they are 5x114.3)

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    2. The Accord was 4x100 in that model.

      Then they went 4x4.5, then in the late '90s the 6-cyl cars went 5x4.5 while the fours stayed 4x4.5 for a while, then they all went 5x4.5 sometime in the mid '00s.

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    3. And yes the Mini is 4x100, those particular wheels are nasty, heavy things.

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  6. Can anyone think of anything other than automobile wheels and tires the diameter is measured in inches but the width is metric?

    It's worse than lumber sizing.

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    Replies
    1. Seriously, how crazy! I've worked around wheels and tires on a daily basis for a decade now and have become used to it, but it's dumb. Most wheels are discussed in inches for diameter and width, but bolt pattern is usually in millimeters. Tires are even worse with wheel diameter in inches and tread width (sidewall to sidewall) in millimeters, but sidewall height as an aspect ratio of height to width. What crackhead came up with that concept?

      Anyone here have a trick to measuring the bolt pattern on a 5-lug wheel? I know there are special bolt pattern tools, but what if you only have a ruler/tape measure? Going from one bolt hole to an opposing one won't give you the exact number on a 5x wheel. For example, if you see a wheel at a junkyard, do you just guess/eyeball/fudge it? I've always wondered what people do.

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    2. Lots of little historical reasons for things.

      Bolt circles are sometimes in mm, but equally often in inches: why are most larger Japanese cars 114.3mm? That's actually 4.5in, which is why you see SN95 Mustang wheels on that hacksaw-swap RX7 a few posts down.

      There's tricks like measuring from the back of one hole to the center of an opposed hole on a 5-lug wheel, but when you've got bolt patterns of:
      5x4.25in (108mm) - Ford Taurus, Thunderbird, Mark VIII, others
      5x110mm - most current small GM, others
      5x112mm - Audi, big VW, Mercedes
      5x4.5in - (114.3mm) - half the cars sold today
      5x115mm - most current big GM, others
      5x120mm - BMW, Aussie GM.
      5x4.75in (120.65mm) - most US GM for fifty years, others
      5x5in (127mm) - big Ford/GM cars '70s-90s, light pickups
      5x130mm - Porsche
      5x135mm - late Ford pickups, maybe others
      5x5.5 (139.7mm) - lots of other pickups

      ...good luck in figuring them out exactly unless you've got some pretty decent measuring tools. It's not unknown, BTW, to run 5x4.75 GM on a BMW or vice-versa.

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    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    4. and if I'm going up to the 5x5 and larger I might as well go down to:

      5x98 - Alfa
      5x100 - various Japanese, VW, VW-platform Audis, small-mid GM '80s-00s.

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    5. And that's without even getting into centerbore diameters...

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    6. Oh, and nothing's worse than lumber sizing, because that's all 'nominal' or 'trade size' (which is spelled f-r-a-u-d-u-l-e-n-t).

      Delete
    7. And Jeebus, it looks like:

      5x4in (102mm) - old 6cyl small Mopars
      5x105mm - some late small GM

      GM now appears to sell cars with bolt patterns at every 5mm increment from 5x100 to 5x120. Why, oh why?

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    8. If we're going to create the ultimate list of 5-bolt wheel pattern applications, we must not forget:

      5x108mm - All Volvo starting late '60s to current, excluding the NedCar S40/V50 (1st gen Mitsuolvo built in NL).

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  7. I was trying to get fairly exhaustive about the bolt patterns, but...as far as the applications go, that'd take a very long time indeed...

    ...though I will add that it looks like the late big Cadillacs including the CTS/CTS-V have gone to the 5x120mm BMW/Holden bolt pattern.

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