Saturday, February 21, 2015

15k: Osso di Seppia: 1969 Alfa Romeo 1750 Spider

 The original Osso di Seppia (bone of cuttlefish) Spider (105/115 series) was designed by Pininfarina and produced by Alfa Romeo from 1966 to 1969.  The first generation (Series 1) is also known as the boat tail or round tail to differentiate it from the later Kamm back (Series 2), duck tail (Series 3) and smooth tail (Series 4).  It is the quintessential affordable classic Italian roadster...but they aren't so affordable these days, but this one doesn't look bad.  Find this 1969 Alfa Romeo 1750 Spider offered for $14,500 in Seattle, WA via craigslist. Tip from Gianni.


The Spider shared much of its mechanical parts with the series 105 Giulia sedan and was first introduced to the world with the name Duetto.  In late 1967 the Duetto name was superseded by the name Spider Veloce, and the car received minor updates (sideview mirror moved from fender to door, changed badges on tail, etc).



This 1750 Spider Veloce is powered by a 1.8 liter version of Alfa Romeo's famous DOHC inline-4.  As with all US market cars, it was fed by SPICA (SocietĂ  Pompe Iniezione Cassani & Affini) fuel injection and rated at 118 horsepower.  The only transmission available was a 5-speed manual gearbox.


The Spider is known for its famous roll as Dustin Hoffman's ride in "The Graduate" but it was the car of choice for many people looking for an imported convertible in the 1960s.  This one looks to be in good condition for its asking price, but a thorough inspection for rust is always a must on any old Italian metal.


See a cooler car for summer car shows? tips@dailyturismo.com

20 comments:

  1. The pictures look to be taken in front of Vintage Racing Motors, Bruce McCaw's rave shop in Redmond. A well known, local Alfista works there, probably one of his cars. He's a good guy,probably an honest car.

    Couple of other things. Mirrors were a dealer add on until '75 if I recall, so the location and kind prior were up to the dealer. Also, the SPICA pump on the '69 was different than the '71 - '81 pumps (no '68 or '70 cars were imported to the US), so parts are a bit more difficult, but Wes Ingram can keep them going vs hacking them up with Webers.

    Oh, and the Series 2 Kamm tails are split into Series 2a, with chrome bumpers, '71 - '74, and the Series 2b, rubber baby buggy bumpers from '75 - '82. In '83 the Giuseppe the Janior duck tail took over.

    Your resident Alfista, Gianni

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for the info, Gianni! I have a question, though. The Standard Catalog of Imported Cars states that the 1779-cc produced 132 hp. Do you think this is incorrect, that the 118 stated above is more accurate? Joe Benson's Alfa Romeo Buyer's Guide indicates that the difference is between Europe (118) and the US (132). Was this because the Euro models did not have SPICA?

      Delete
  2. Weird. My comment seems to have disappeared. Oh well, I'll try again. Gianni, is the 118 hp Euro spec versus 132 hp US number attributed to the differences between the SPICA and the Weber carbs? Why wouldn't they have the SPICA worldwide, if it performed better? Were they saving money by selling the Euro models with older technology or something?

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    Replies
    1. K2MC - I take the hp ratings with a grain of salt. The rest of world cars in contemporary road tests have hp listed as 132 gross / 122 net. The US road tests have 132 SAE. Seem pretty close.

      My theory on why only N. America got the SPICA was cost, both in terms of manufacture and the cost of establishing the infrastructure for service and support. The Italians were so paranoid about the US emissions rules and if they violated them somehow they would be booted out of the US that, according to the chief engineer of Alfa's US subsidiary, the dealers were not allowed to work on the SPICA pump. If a customer had problems with it, they replaced it with a new one and send the old unit back to Milano. Heaven forbid if the tamper-proof adjustment screw showed any evidence of tampering...

      I think this paranoia, and that Alfa let no information out of Milano about the system, even to its dealers, is what lead to the bad reputation of the SPICA system. It really is a cool system, a little analog computer, metering out the fuel. My car has 139K on its original pump, and Wes Ingram doesn't see any issues with it when I have taken the car to him.

      Delete
    2. None of my Alfas had it, so I never had to deal with it. Thanks for your reply!

      Delete
  3. So, now that the game is over, I'd like to share some of the cars I rejected. Why? Because they're still interesting. I know a lot of people chose concept cars (which is fine, despite my kvetching) but I chose not to, instead focusing on production cars, even if the numbers produced were just a handful. Here's my first one:

    1941 Chrysler Newport Phaeton
    [img]http://images.forum-auto.com/mesimages/476113/1941ChryslerNewportDualCowlPhaetonLeBarond.jpg[/img]

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  4. The Elite Laser 917 was a kit car, I believe. I'm not sure, but it may be the same as the Aquila GT. The URL of the image below seems to indicate that this is the case.

    [img]http://image.kitcarmag.com/f/12072871/0809kc_09_z+23rd_annual_carlisle_import_kit_replicar_nationals+aquila_gt.jpg[/img]

    ReplyDelete
  5. I think this is another kit car named the Wildcat. I couldn't find any information and it obviously has nothing to do with the JPR car by the same name. If anybody knows anything about it, please speak up! Surely someone out there knows all about it.

    [img]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8a/Ledl_AS_160.jpg/800px-Ledl_AS_160.jpg[/img]

    ReplyDelete
  6. I suppose the next one has every right to included in the "Concealed Headlight" list. At least, as much as the Pontiac Mera is. This is the Enterra Vipre. Based on the Fiero, it was rebodied and supposedly had a completely different interior. I've never seen one in real life, so I don't know. Nor have I seen any interior pictures. They're probably out there and I'll have to look. This car should be of particular interest to Canadian gearheads.

    [img]http://www.freedomsphoenix.com/Uploads/173/Graph/Enterra_Vipre.jpg[/img]

    ReplyDelete
  7. ...and every time you see a 308, don't you just run and look at the interior to see if it's actually a Fiero? Of course you do! So do I.

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  8. Never more than a concept car...the Cadillac NART. Stunning, really and a design you've seen before. It's pure Italian until you get to those...white walls?!? Oops.

    [img]http://image.motortrend.com/f/wot/ebay-find-the-oneoff-1970-cadillac-nart-zagato-3088/60408162+w554/12503893.jpeg.jpg[/img]

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  9. And yes, I swear to you that it was designed for Cadillac, despite the yellow sticker. Look it up! Or, correct me if I'm wrong. I love to learn new things!

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    1. Those Cadillac/Oldsmobile wheel covers suggest its on a Eldo/Toro running gear?

      Delete
    2. You are correct, Hunsbloger. Apparently, the Eldo powertrain was used, but repositioned to make it mid-engine. Yet it still remained a 4-seater, somehow. Those back seats couldn't have been very roomy. Pretty, isn't it? I find the windows a little awkward, but still.

      Delete
  10. Another concept. Ah, what could have been. I present to you the Volvo GTZ 3000.

    [img]https://ranwhenparkeddotnet.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/volvo-gtz-3000-1.jpg?w=700&h=&crop=1[/img]

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    Replies
    1. Another angle of the Volvo 3000 GTZ. Zagato really got a lot of mileage out of that shape.

      [img]http://staticclub.caradisiac.com/1/passion-marque-modele/volvo-unique/photo/010477010/51421372fa/volvo-unique-volvo-gtz-3000-img.jpg[/img]

      Delete
  11. The Bandini 1000 Turbo is another one that could possibly included. But I didn't submit it because I have so little information on it. It's hard to get the proportions from a photograph, but these were extremely small and odd looking little cars.

    [img]http://blog.jpblogauto.com/public/Logos6/bandini01.jpg[/img]

    ReplyDelete
  12. Oops! I just realized I posted these in the wrong place - even after I suggested a redirect for all of kaibeezy's hard work. Shoot, that was dumb. Oh well. I don't know that anybody really cares anymore, other than me of course.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Here’s another that I rejected for obvious reasons; they aren’t even headlights! But the Nismo Auto-Louver Lamps fog lights are just too cool to let time forget.

    [img]http://i484.photobucket.com/albums/rr206/Nakazoto_japan/CCN%20Cars%20and%20Parts/p1.jpg[/img]

    ReplyDelete
  14. Here's a car that most definitely should be included; the Lombardi Grand Prix, also known as the OTAS 820 and Abarth Scorpione SS.

    [img]http://www.kultur.at/van/flame/gast/set02/gast088_Fiat_Lombardi.jpg[/img]

    ReplyDelete

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